A new website is sometimes a bad idea

“We need a new web design!” Or “Our website has to be turned upside down!” These are slogans that are invariably evacuated every few years in many organizations. But is that always correct? It is not always necessary to set up a website or web design “from scratch” with every change or challenge in business management or marketing. In fact, there are plenty of bad reasons for “redescribing” or radically transforming a website. Such a fallacy is, for example, the vague notion that the website needs a new web design because visitors “get bored”. These are arguments from advertising agencies or digital marketing agencies that are embarrassed by work. Or from marketing management that wants to put a website project on the agenda from the deeds of motivation and motivation. Often, however, an objective, numerical basis is lacking.

What is the percentage of new vs. returning visitors to the site?

In every decent website statistics program it is easy to find out what the relationship is between new visit versus repeat visit. Below we show how this ratio is on our own website (measured over a period of one year):

best website designs

Almost 80% of our website visitors come there for the very first time. Those visitors can not be so tired of our website: they have never seen the website before. Although our website is of course not representative of every other website, this is a common pattern. So the need for innovation is usually not with the visitor, but with the advertising agency / digital marketing agency / marketing management. And that is not the target group of the website.

How many website visitors come from search engines?

If a successful website gets a lot of visitors from the search engines, then that is a good reason to scratch your head once again before giving or rebuilding / rebuilding that website. A new website often gets a “dip” in Google to endure. Restoring that dip can require a lot of time and money, not to mention the lost leads. Is the urge for cosmetic improvement of the website really worth it?

Once again a piece of figures from our own practice (again measured over a year). Three-quarters of our visitors come from the search engines … those are numbers that we do not just put in jeopardy on the basis of a slight unease about the appearance of our website.

“But the conversion of our current website is too low!”

In itself this is a better argument, because in any case it is reasoned in terms of results. But usually a completely new web design is not the best way to a higher conversion – and it is certainly not the most cost efficient way. Often it is much more effective and cheaper to find out which pages on the website should yield more results and only improve those pages. Another template, better texts, more or less visuals, optimization of forms … all of this can be done at relatively low costs and quickly.

The moral of the story?

Smart marketing managers and entrepreneurs focus on small, incremental improvements and the testing and measuring of their results, instead of rigorous and prestigious “all-needs-different” website projects. Develop a website through instead of again. This costs less and results in more and faster results in 9 out of 10 cases.

PS: Of course there are many situations that do warrant a new web design and / or new website. For example if the (CMS) technology behind the website is out of date and more and better functionality is needed. Or if brand and organization have gone through developments that are no longer reflected by the current website. Or if the website is simply hard to find in the search engines and there are identifiable and improvable causes in the website. In all these cases you can always contact us at reachout@cruxcreativesolutions.com.

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